Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE



Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 12/22/2019

If you receive an offer to purchase your house, determining how to proceed with this proposal sometimes can be difficult. Ultimately, a home seller needs to weigh the pros and cons of accepting an offer to purchase. And if the pros outweigh the cons, it probably is a good idea to accept the homebuying proposal.

When it comes to reviewing an offer to purchase, there are many reasons why a seller should accept this proposal, and these include:

1. An offer to purchase matches or exceeds a home seller's expectations.

If a home seller receives an offer to purchase at or above the initial asking price for his or her house, accepting the proposal likely is a no-brainer. In fact, a seller may want to provide an instant "Yes" to this offer so he or she can quickly move on to the next step of the property selling journey.

Of course, it helps to establish realistic home selling expectations before listing a residence. If a seller sets a competitive initial asking price that corresponds to his or her home selling expectations, then this individual may be better equipped than others to enjoy a seamless property selling experience.

2. An offer to purchase falls in line with the current housing market's conditions.

If you're selling a home in a buyer's market, you may pounce at the opportunity to accept any offer to purchase that comes your way. Comparatively, if you list your house in a seller's market, you may need to consider all of your options closely before you accept an offer to purchase.

As a home seller, you should evaluate the current state of the real estate market. If you allocate time and resources to learn about the housing market, you can gain real estate market insights to help you determine whether to accept an offer to purchase.

3. An offer to purchase enables a home seller to speed up the property selling process.

If you're operating on a tight home selling timeline, you may be more inclined than ever before to accept an offer to purchase, even if it falls below your initial expectations. Conversely, if you plan ahead for the home selling journey, you may reduce the risk of facing a time crunch to sell your house.

For home sellers, hiring a real estate agent is key. This housing market professional can help a seller prepare for the real estate market and ensure that a seller sets a competitive price for his or her house. Plus, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open house events to showcase a residence to prospective buyers. And if a seller receives an offer to purchase, a real estate agent can provide a recommendation about the best way to respond to this homebuying proposal.

Ready to add your house to the real estate market? Collaborate with a real estate agent, and you can boost the likelihood of getting an offer to purchase your home that allows you to maximize the value of your property.





Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 10/28/2018

If you’re in the market to buy a home, you want to find the perfect place for you and your family. In a seller’s market, the competition can be fierce. As a buyer, you may be under the impression that you need to make the highest offer in order to secure the home of your dreams. The problem is, you may never know what price other people have offered for the same home.


Know Your Budget


First, you should know what kind of a budget you have to work with to buy a home. You probably have done an online search to see what’s out there and what price range the homes you like fall into. You’ll want to go beyond the online search and actually see some of your favorite houses in person because pictures can be deceiving. 


Next, you’ll want to do is speak with a lender. This can help you before you even hit the ground running on your home search. A lender can pre-qualify you then work you through the process of pre-approval. This will give you a definitive number to work with when searching for a home. With this number, you’ll know how much you can offer comfortably when you find that house you fall in love with.


Make A List Of Priorities


Finding the “perfect” house usually requires that you make a few compromises along the way. It’s very unlikely that you’ll find one house that gives you everything you want in one place without a bit of imagination. Jot down all of the things about a home that are the most important to you. These items could include:


  • The neighborhood
  • Big backyard
  • Open floor plan
  • Number of bedrooms
  • Hardwood floors
  • The size of the rooms
  • Style of the house
  • Granite countertops


Whatever is important to you should be on the list. Next, go through the list and see what can be compromised on. There are probably a few luxuries on the list that you could stand to give up in lieu of something else.  


The Offer


Once you find that home you know that you absolutely want to live in, you’re going to want to make an offer. Let your realtor know immediately that you’re interested in the home and they can get to work. Your realtor can help you to make an offer that’s reasonable based on the asking price and your budget. Your offer doesn’t have to be thousands of dollars over the asking price for you to win the bid. There are a couple of strategies that can help you to land the right home even if you’re not stretching your budget to the max.


Showing You’re Serious


Taking steps like being pre-approved and having all of your finances in order can help to give you the upper hand in the house hunt. Sellers don’t want to deal with a buyer who is ultimately going to have issues where the deal will fall through.


The Offer Letter


Writing a letter along with your offer is a great personal touch to help you land the home of your dreams. If a seller knows that the home they have lived in and loved will go to another owner who is going to appreciate and take the same great care of the home, they will be more likely to go with you as a buyer. First, tell the seller a bit about yourself and why you love the home so much. Compliment the landscaping. Tell the seller just how much your kids are going to appreciate living in the home. Don’t be afraid to get too personal when it comes to writing an offer letter to the sellers. They will appreciate honesty and a candid approach in the sometimes all too serious matter of buying a home.





Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 6/24/2018

Let's face it – reviewing an offer to purchase can be difficult. And if a home seller feels unsure about a homebuying proposal, this individual may want to consider rejecting the offer to purchase.

Ultimately, there are many reasons why a home seller may decline an offer to purchase, and these include:

1. An offer to purchase fails to meet a home seller's expectations.

If a home seller receives a "lowball" offer to purchase, he or she may submit an instant rejection. In fact, this seller likely will have no regrets about declining the offer to purchase and continuing to wait for a homebuying proposal that matches his or her expectations.

As a home seller, it is vital to establish realistic property selling expectations before you list your residence. If you set a competitive initial asking price for your home, you may reduce the likelihood of getting lowball homebuying proposals. And as a result, you may be better equipped than ever before to speed up the home selling journey.

2. A home seller has multiple offers to purchase at his or her disposal.

If a home seller receives multiple offers to purchase his or her home, this individual likely has a tough decision to make. Fortunately, a seller can review his or her options and make an informed decision.

When a home seller receives several offers to purchase his or her residence, there is no need to rush to reject or accept a proposal. Instead, a seller should evaluate each homebuying proposal closely and use all of the information at his or her disposal to determine the best course of action.

3. A home seller can afford to wait.

If a home seller lists his or her residence in a buyer's market, the demand for houses may be limited. Conversely, if a seller lists a home in a seller's market, this individual may receive many offers to purchase as soon as his or her residence becomes available.

Sometimes, a home seller who can afford to be patient may choose to reject an offer to purchase in a buyer's market, even if the proposal is competitive. Because if the seller waits for the real estate market to improve, this individual may be able to optimize the value of his or her residence at a later time.

For home sellers who are committed to getting the best price for a home, it generally is a good idea to employ a real estate agent. This housing market professional will help a seller establish a competitive initial asking price for his or her residence. Plus, a real estate agent will set up open house events and home showings to promote this house to potential buyers. And if a seller receives an offer to purchase, a real estate agent can recommend whether the seller should reject, accept or counter the proposal.

Want to list your house and streamline the property selling journey? Hire a real estate agent, and you can work with a home selling expert to evaluate any offers to purchase your residence.





Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 5/13/2018

If you buy or sell a home, it is normal to expect negotiations after an initial offer is submitted. However, differentiating between a "fair" counter proposal and an exorbitant offer sometimes can be difficult.

Lucky for you, we're here to help homebuyers and home sellers submit a successful counter offer at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three best practices to help you create a successful counter proposal.

1. Consider Your Counterpart's Perspective

If you are buying a home, consider the seller's perspective. Or, if you're selling a house, evaluate the buyer's perspective. In both scenarios, you can gain insights into what your counterpart might be thinking and tailor your counter offer accordingly.

For example, if a house has been available for several weeks or months, a homebuyer should consider this information as he or she preps a counter proposal. By doing so, a homebuyer can weigh the pros and cons of waiting out a buyer's market and craft an effective counter offer.

On the other hand, if a home seller has several offers in hand, this seller may want to consider submitting a counter offer that matches or exceeds a house's initial asking price. With a seller's market in place, a home seller should have no trouble stirring up plenty of interest in a home, even if a buyer rejects a counter proposal.

2. Evaluate the Housing Market

Take a look at the prices of available houses in your city or town. This housing market data can help you differentiate between a buyer's and seller's market – something that may prove to be exceedingly valuable as you put together a counter offer.

Also, examine the prices of recently sold houses that are similar to the home that you want to buy or sell. By leveraging this housing market data, you can evaluate the prices of similar properties and boost your chances of submitting a competitive counter proposal.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you're struggling to create a fair counter offer, it certainly helps to consult with a real estate agent.

Ultimately, a real estate agent is committed to helping homebuyers and home sellers achieve their respective goals. This housing market professional can provide a wealth of housing market data to help a homebuyer or home seller craft a viable offer. Furthermore, a real estate agent is happy to provide honest, unbiased home offer recommendations, ensuring both buyers and sellers can make informed decisions.

Let's not forget about the support that a real estate agent provides throughout the homebuying and home selling journey, either. A real estate agent will be ready to respond to a buyer's or seller's questions without delay. Plus, this housing market professional will go above and beyond the call of duty to ensure all parties involved in a home sale enjoy a seamless experience.

Ready to negotiate a counter offer? Use the aforementioned best practices, and you can quickly and effortlessly create a successful counter proposal.




Tags: Offer to Purchase   offer  
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Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 12/4/2016

You recently listed your home on the real estate market, and now, you've received your first offer. However, you only have a short period of time to review the proposal and accept, reject or counter it. Determining how to handle an offer on your home can be challenging. Fortunately, we're happy to help you fully evaluate an offer so you can make an informed decision. There are numerous factors to consider as you review an offer on your house, including: 1. Price In some cases, homebuyers may submit a "lowball" offer in the hopes of getting a seller to jump at a quick sale. If a home seller accepts this offer, a homebuyer is able to purchase a terrific home at a bargain price. Conversely, if a home seller rejects or counters the offer, a homebuyer may have an opportunity to reconsider his or her options. As a home seller, you should consider how much you are willing to accept for your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can list your home for a fair price and act quickly and effectively as you receive offers. Also, flexibility is paramount for home sellers. And even though you may list your home for a particular price, you may want to consider accepting an offer below your initial asking price if you're looking for a quick sale. 2. Sale of a Buyer's Home Although a homebuyer may submit an offer that is at or above your initial asking price, the proposal may have strings attached that could slow down the home selling process. For instance, a homebuyer could make an offer that is contingent upon him or her selling a residence within a set period of time. But if this homebuyer is unable to sell his or her house, your home sale could fall through, which could cost you both time and money. In this scenario, consider your options carefully. If you believe you can receive other offers from homebuyers who don't require this contingency, you may be better off rejecting or countering the proposal. 3. Your Timeline If you've already secured a new home and need to sell your current residence as quickly as possible, you may want to consider accepting an offer even if it is below your initial asking price. On the other hand, if you are able to afford two mortgages for an extended period of time, you may be better equipped to wait out a slow real estate market. When it comes to determining whether to accept an offer on your residence, consulting with your real estate agent usually is a great idea. This professional can offer expert resources you might struggle to find elsewhere and empower you with the insights you need to make the best decision possible. Consider the aforementioned factors as you evaluate an offer on your home, and you should be able to accept, reject or counter a proposal with confidence.