Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE



Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 11/3/2019

The single most difficulty first-time homebuyers face is being able to save up the down payment. From student loans to medical bills; wanting to start a family or live in a more expensive city; coming up with those funds keeps many potential buyers out of the market.

In fact, if you donít have your down payment saved up yet, you probably donít think you can buy, but a recent report called the Realtors Confidence Index Survey Report claims that over eighty percent of first-time homebuying transactions take place with less than the common twenty-percent down payment.

Thankfully, there are programs out there just for you. These grants and funds may be just the boost you need. 

USDA Loans

If youíre interested in living in an area designated as rural, you may qualify for a home loan using a program set up by the Department of Agriculture. The USDA loans help low- and moderate-income buyers purchase homes in rural areas. While a down payment isnít required, buyers must meet income eligibility requirements. They also must agree to live in the house as their primary residence. Specific addresses apply for these loan guarantees, so if youíre already looking at a rural home, double check the location to see if it qualifies.

National Homebuyers Fund

This non-profit corporation helps potential homebuyers with their down payment grants and closing costs, mortgage credits, energy efficiency financing, and other programs. To take advantage of these programs, the buyer must also qualify for FHA, VA, USDA, or conventional loans and be a low-to-moderate income earner. The program does not require that the buyer be a first-time homeowner so former homeowners who are looking to re-enter the market may qualify. Also, itís FICO score and debt-to-income ratios are flexible.

HUD Neighbor Next Door

Purchasing a home through this program works to encourage buying in areas selected for renewal or revitalization. It provides funds for teachers, firefighters, law enforcement, and emergency medical technicians to purchase in these neighborhoods. This incentive is substantial, with up to fifty-percent reduction in the list price of an eligible home via a bid-selection process. 

If youíre interested in the HUD program and qualify in one of the public servant categories, contact a HUD-registered real estate broker for assistance. Or, contact your neighborhood real estate professional and ask about local programs in your area.





Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 1/17/2016

OrganizedWhether you buy your first home later in life, or directly from college, buying your first home is a major milestone in your life.† For that reason, there are things you need to be knowledgeable about before your purchase is complete. You will want to safeguard yourself so you know that you are getting a home and a loan that you can afford. Here are a few tips from mortgage and real estate pros to help prepare you for the biggest purchase of your life. Using an Agent If you are a buyer, then there is no reason not to use a real estate professional. It does not cost you any more money to hire an agent. That agent will do more than find you that perfect house. You will discover that after you find a house is when you will need that agent the most.† The agent will use their expertise to present your offer to the seller and then address issues that may arise between contract and closing. House Hunting Remember, location, location, location. This is very important when buying a house.† Location plays a big part in determining the market value of the home. Before you start the house hunting process, make sure you know what neighborhood is a good location for you. Also, it would be good to have an idea of what style home you are looking for. Real estate moves quickly, so if you see a property that you love, you should move on it before someone else does. Find a Loan that Works for Your It sure can be tricky business trying decide what kind of loan is right for you.† There are many different types of loans that you should be aware of.† There is an Adjustable rate mortgage which has an interest rate that is linked to an economic index. So as the index changes your interest rate and payments may go up or down. There is also a 30 Year Fixed Rate Mortgage as well as a 15-Year Fixed Rate Mortgage. Some state and county maximum loan amount restrictions may apply. Home Buyer Alternatives for First Timer Saving for a first home can sometime seem like itís a hill that too steep, but donít worry there are assistance programs that can help. The Federal Housing Administration offers loans to people with a credit score as low as 640, low down payments and down payment assistance. There are also VA and USDA loans: Certain active members of the military and veterans as well as qualifying residents of designated rural areas can qualify for a 0% down-payment housing loans that are free of mortgage insurance fees. How Much Do You Have to Put Down? It really depends on what type of loan you have. If you have a conventional loan then you may have to put as much as 20% down. It is possible to put 5% down on a conventional loan if you donít mind paying mortgage insurance.† If you go with the FHA loan you will need at least 3.5 % down.† For people who are relying on others to help with down payments, an FHA loan may be a good option. First time home buyers need to look around and know that there are a multitude of down payment assistance offers by state or local governments. Closing cost: There can be a lot of hidden fees in closing costs; first time home buyers should be aware of these costs.† These fees are typically included in the closing costs, including fees for commissions, appraisals, inspections, certifications and surveying.† There will also be fees for government record changes, tax and title services and transfer taxes.